This course uses easily accessible dialogues by Plato to explore the days prior to and after the trial of Socrates as well as his defense in the face of a death sentence.  Euthyphro takes place a few days before the trial; Apology (Defense) reports his speeches to the court; Crito tells of a good friend’s attempt to free Socrates, who refused the efforts; and a brief excerpt from Phaedo describes his death.  The discussion will include the form and content of the dialogues as well as why Socrates has become for many the epitome of a philosopher.

Hansen

Forest Hansen, Ph.D.

Forest earned a BA in English at Harvard, an MA in English at the University of Wisconsin, and a Ph.D. in Philosophy at Johns Hopkins, and took graduate courses in Counseling Psychology at Northwestern University. For 35 years he taught a variety of courses in English and philosophy, as well as courses in Greek Civilization, Classics in Western Thought, and required MA interdisciplinary courses on various subjects, co-led by professors in humanities, natural science, and social science. He co-created and directed a college travel program studying Ancient Greek and Byzantine Civilizations. After retirement he and his wife lived for 10 years in England, where Forest founded the first Great Books discussion group in that country and served as Parish Footpath Officer and secretary of the Alvechurch Village Society. He and his wife moved to Easton in 2003.

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